Run for Columbus City Council!

Starting this year Columbus City Council elections will be kinda based on 9 districts.
We say kinda, because while candidates will be required to reside within 1 of the 9 districts to run for that district, form a 5 person committee and collect 250 valid signatures from district residents, the actual primary and election will be _-= city wide =-_ (same as ever).

Yup.
The same 50k-ish voters will continue to control what happens in Columbus, despite the charter amendment that everyone thought was meant to adopt ward-style elections.

Signature Requirement (City Council) … Min. 250 – No Max.c
Filing Deadline … 4:00 p.m., February 1, 2023
Filing Fee … $45.00 ($20.00 petition filing fee & $25.00 O.E.C. fee)

Contact us to discuss next steps for forming your committee, collecting valid signatures, getting on the ballot and fundraising.

Source: https://vote.franklincountyohio.gov/BOEL-website/media/Election-Info/2023/(1)%20Primary%20Election%20-%20May%202,%202023/(1)%20Notices%20of%20Election/2023-Primary-Schedule-4.pdf

A Republic, If We Can Keep It

As 2023 arrives and the two-year anniversary of the infamous January 6th insurrection approaches, there is plenty to be grateful for as our imperfect nation ventures into the new year. Of course, there is also still much work to be done and more good fights to be fought. Here in Ohio, fascism continues to stand on our doorstep –– and is perhaps even knocking on the door –– especially as a new GOP supermajority is set to be seated in our Statehouse in January and Governor Mike DeWine starts his second term, both of which were decided by a majority of Ohio voters. Because of these recent midterm results, Ohio Republicans have been given a mandate –– and they will likely use it to their own advantage, just as they have since seizing power of every branch of our state government in 2010.

Case in point –– one of the Ohio GOP’s first power grabs after 2010 was to gerrymander Democrats out of relevance, redrawing Ohio’s state legislative and congressional districts in such a way that Democrats would eventually be relegated to obscurity. Consequently, Ohio’s Democrats have been plagued by a lack of funding, infighting and an inability to recruit quality candidates ever since. Then in 2013, when the GOP was gearing up for former Governor John Kasich’s re-election campaign in 2014, Republican power brokers realized the Libertarian Party of Ohio posed a threat to their win numbers, so they passed new ballot access rules to relegate Libertarians to obscurity as well. Consequently, Ohio’s Libertarians have been plagued by a lack of funding, infighting and an inability to recruit quality candidates ever since.

After their landslide victories in 2022, now the GOP is “coming for it all” –– to paraphrase Athens, Ohio’s own Joe Burrow in a less-fun way, when he was asked about the Cincinnati Bengals’ run for the Super Bowl earlier this year. In Ohio Republicans’ case, their next power grab will be to make it harder for Ohioans to amend our state constitution through a direct vote, a procedure that has been in place for over 100 years. This constitutional right ensured that Ohioans had a way to bypass an unresponsive state legislature and was endorsed by principled high-profile Republicans at the time, such as former President Teddy Roosevelt. Perhaps the irony is lost on Ohio’s modern day “Republicans” that their name derives from the term republic, in which power is held by the people and their elected representatives.

In fact, one of the most famous and often cited stories of the founding of our country –– an imperfect representative democratic constitutional republic as it may be, for anyone who needs an even longer definition –– is that as Benjamin Franklin was leaving Independence Hall in 1787, he was asked by a bystander about what kind of government the Constitutional Convention had created. Would it be “a republic or a monarchy?” Franklin reportedly replied, “A republic, if you can keep it.” Those poignant words still ring true today, especially as the potential tyranny of the supermajority –– or even a vocal minority –– attempts to enact policies that negatively impact millions of individuals’ rights. After all, republics are supposed to protect the constitutional rights of all citizens, not take them away.

Perhaps Ohio’s modern day Republicans need a reminder of this fact, especially considering that the Republican Party was originally founded as a third political party in the 1850s that sought to create a coalition of abolitionists –– those who were vehemently opposed to the practice of slavery in the United States –– as well as disenfranchised Whigs, the only political opposition at that time to the powerful and growing Democratic contingent in the country. Instead, this political party that started as a minor political party focused on protecting the rights of minorities has now turned their backs on both of those groups, while their supermajority only grows. From destroying minor parties’ ballot access to making it harder for poorer Ohioans to vote, Ohio Republicans seem to not understand the basic definition of “republic” at all.

So now it is our job as citizens to remind them. Earlier this month, I was proud to join over 500 demonstrators from over 170 organizations at the Statehouse to remind our elected representatives who exactly they are representing and what they can and cannot do as our elected representatives. We were there to remind them that their plan to make it harder for Ohioans to amend our state constitution would not be an easy fight. Fortunately, the legislature scrapped their plans to pass HJR6 due to a lack of support –– and while it may be gone for now, the effort could come back in 2023. If it does, this same coalition of Ohioans will be ready to fight again. After all, this is still a republic –– if we can keep it.

Travis Irving, 2018 Ohio Libertarian Gubernatorial Candidate 
“This column was also published in The Columbus Free Press.” 

For Ourselves And Our Posterity

My wife and I recently celebrated the birth of our first child. A few weeks before he was born we were watching a particularly depressing evening news broadcast. We sat through half a dozen stories that evoked feelings of anger, sadness, and despair before looking at each other and asking, “What are we doing bringing a kid into this crazy world?” The question was somewhat tongue-in-cheek, but I imagine every parent asks themselves that at some point and it’s really not surprising why. Let’s take stock of where we’re at…

We’ve just come out of a multi-year pandemic that resulted in millions of lives lost. The attempt to control the severity of the pandemic has had a myriad of negative consequences. In an effort to save the crashing economy, the federal government initiated trillions of dollars of additional spending[1] with assistance from the federal reserve, which printed the money out of thin air. This increase in the money supply[2] devalued the dollar, and coupled with labor shortages, caused price increases that haven’t been seen in decades. Drug overdose deaths are higher[3], violent crime is on the rise[4], and home ownership is now even more of a pipedream for millennials and Generation Z[5].

When the pandemic started, children were sent home from school as districts scrambled to facilitate remote learning. When they were allowed to attend in-person, they were often required to wear face coverings. There is evidence that this response to COVID has saddled our children with a number of issues. We now have stunted personality development of young adults[6] and a mental health crisis for children[7]. ACT scores have dropped to their lowest in 30 years[8]. Two decades of progress in math and reading have vanished[9]. Our kids are now more obese than ever, with evidence that the average BMI for children have doubled[10].

In times like this, we should be able to turn to our leaders for guidance on where to go from here. Let’s check in on them to see where their priorities are: We have governors who are trying to harm the reputation of those in the opposing party by punting immigrants between states like a political football[11]. They’re sending billions of dollars (that we don’t have) to Ukraine[12] for a war that doesn’t involve us, increasing the risk of nuclear war with Russia. They’re beefing up IRS enforcement[13] to try and shake more pennies out of our piggy banks. And they’re arguing over whether Elon Musk should be allowed to buy Twitter[14].

So we face some large and unwieldy problems, and we have a political class that is either unwilling or unable to tackle them. I’ve always cared about liberty and freedom, but now I find myself asking what sort of country we’re going to be leaving for my son. Should we load him up with a public debt and a tax bill that he has no ability to consent to paying? Should we continue to devalue our currency and inflate the costs of college and home ownership? Am I supposed to be okay with him being obese, stupid, and depressed the next time a public health crisis emerges?

Since we cannot rely on our existing leaders to solve our problems, and since these leaders seem determined to curb our liberties at every step, we must roll up our sleeves and provide solutions ourselves. As Libertarians, we must be the voice calling for sound money, reduced government spending and taxation, and an end to involvement in foreign wars. It is imperative that we never allow the education or the social and emotional development of our children to suffer at the hands of bureaucrats and noisy fear-mongers. The fallout of the response to COVID should be the perfect case-study demonstrating how negative consequences are forced upon people when the government implements top-down edicts.

Fortunately, there is hope to be found in this sea of tears. Public trust in government remains very low[15]. The CDC has admitted that it got some things wrong[16]. More and more people are taking their children out of government schools and enrolling in private school[17] or opting to homeschool[18]. Homeschooled students tend to outperform their public school counterparts.[19] [20] And Americans are more willing to voluntarily help others with their time and money than they were before COVID[21].

The evidence is clear: top-down solutions have a tendency to create more harm than good. Solutions that are local and voluntary can minimize widespread risk and allow for faster error correction. Future generations are depending on us to set things right and we need to be ready to answer that call.

Jordan BertkeFCLPO Executive Committee At-Large Member


[1] https://www.usaspending.gov/disaster/covid-19?publicLaw=all

[2] https://fred.stlouisfed.org/graph/?g=V2aQ

[3] https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2020/p1218-overdose-deaths-covid-19.html

[4] https://www.safehome.org/resources/crime-statistics-by-state/

[5] https://www.statista.com/topics/4403/millennials-and-real-estate-in-the-us/

[6] https://www.sciencenews.org/article/pandemic-young-adults-personality-development

[7] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8445752/

[8] https://leadershipblog.act.org/2022/10/GradClassRelease2022.html

[9] https://www.nytimes.com/2022/09/01/us/national-test-scores-math-reading-pandemic.html

[10] https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/70/wr/mm7037a3.htm?s_cid=mm7037a3_w

[11] https://nypost.com/2022/09/15/ron-desantis-ships-2-planes-of-migrants-to-marthas-vineyard/

[12] https://nypost.com/2022/10/04/biden-sending-ukraine-625m-in-weapons-from-shrinking-us-stockpile/

[13] https://taxfoundation.org/inflation-reduction-act-irs-funding/

[14] https://ww w.foxnews.com/politics/congress-senate-house-musk-twitter

[15] https://www.pewresearch.org/politics/2022/06/06/public-trust-in-government-1958-2022/

[16] https://www.timesfreepress.com/news/2022/aug/24/opinion-cdc-finally-admits-it-botched-covid/

[17] https://www.cnbc.com/2021/05/07/during-covid-more-families-switch-to-private-school-from-public-.html

[18] https://www.census.gov/library/stories/2021/03/homeschooling-on-the-rise-during-covid-19-pandemic.html

[19] https://www.researchgate.net/publication/232544669_The_Impact_of_Schooling_on_Academic_Achievement_Evidence_From_Homeschooled_and_Traditionally_Schooled_Students

[20] https://www.nheri.org/homeschool-sat-scores-for-2014-higher-than-national-average/

[21] https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-022-08748-2

Run for Local Office!

Have you considered running for public office, but find yourself intimidated by all the rules and process?
We can help! We have experienced past candidates, and current elected officials, that can train, explain and help you through every step in the process!
If you ran for office before, consider running again, your odds actually go up on the second try!

The deadline for filing for the May Primary is 4:00 p.m., February 1, 2023! Write-In Filing Deadline, 4:00 p.m., February 21.

Here are the localities and roles up for election in Franklin County for 2023:

FRANKLIN COUNTY MUNICIPAL COURT
Handouts: Acknowledgement of Notice of Judicial FDS, Notice of Judicial Candidate Seminars,
Acknowledgement of Notice of ORC, Receipt
Petition: Special Form 3-I (Franklin County)
Signature Requirement … Min. 50 – Max. 150
Filing Deadline … 4:00 p.m., February 1, 2023
Filing Fee … $80.00 ($50.00 petition filing fee & $30.00 O.E.C. fee)
Offices to be elected:
Judge, full term commencing 1-1-2024 … Andrea C. Peeples
Judge, full term commencing 1-2-2024 … Cindi Morehart
Judge, full term commencing 1-3-2024 … Jarrod B. Skinner
Clerk, full term commencing 1-1-2024 … Lori Tyack
Nominated by petition – these offices do not appear on the primary ballot.

CITY OF COLUMBUS
Handouts: Acknowledgement of Notice of FDS, Acknowledgement of Notice of ORC, Receipt
Petition: Special Columbus – Single; Columbus City Council
Signature Requirement (Mayor) … Min. 1,000 – No Max.c
Signature Requirement (City Council) … Min. 250 – No Max.c
Filing Deadline … 4:00 p.m., February 1, 2023
Filing Fee … $45.00 ($20.00 petition filing fee & $25.00 O.E.C. fee)
Offices … Mayor (Ginther)
… Nine Council Seats (Districts 1 – 9)
Non-Partisan ballot. If no more than two candidates are certified for a contest, then no
primary election will be held.
Additional Requirements:
Petitions shall contain the names and addresses of five registered electors of the City of
Columbus designated in advance by the candidate or candidates as a nominating
committee.

CITY OF GAHANNA
Handouts: Acknowledgement of Notice of FDS, Acknowledgement of Notice of ORC, Receipt
Petition: Special Form Gahanna Mayor Nominating Petition
Signature Requirement … Min. 50 – Max. 100
c
Filing Deadline … 4:00 p.m., February 1, 2023
Filing Fee … $45.00 ($20.00 petition fee and $25.00 OEC fee)
Offices … Mayor (Jadwin)
A non-partisan primary for Mayor only. Two to be nominated.

CITY OF HILLIARD
Handouts: Acknowledgement of Notice of FDS, Acknowledgement of Notice of ORC, Receipt
Petition: Form 2-I
Signature Requirement
Major Party …Min. 50 – Max. 150
Minor Party …..Min. 25 – Max. 75
Filing Deadline…4:00 p.m., February 1, 2023
Filing Fee … $45.00 ($20.00 petition fee and $25.00 OEC fee)
Offices…Three Council Seats
(Marsh, Tarazi, Vermillion)
Partisan Primary – In the event the number of candidates from a political party is less
than or equal to the number of positions to be filled in the next General Election, then no
primary election need be held.
City of Hilliard – INDEPENDENTS:
Petition: Form 3-N
Signature Requirement ….. Min. 159 – Max. 477*
Filing Deadline….4:00 p.m., May 1, 2023
Filing Fee … $45.00 ($20.00 petition fee and $25.00 OEC fee)
Additional requirements per charter – No group petitions and signers of petitions are
restricted to the number of offices to be voted on. Nominating Committee not required.

CITY OF REYNOLDSBURG
Handouts: Acknowledgement of Notice of FDS, Acknowledgement of Notice of ORC, Receipt
Petition: Form 2-I
Signature Requirement
Major Party … Min. 50 – Max. 150 (Ward Council Min. 25 – Max. 75)
Minor Party ….. Min. 25 – Max. 75 (Ward Council Min. 13 – Max. 39)
Filing Deadline…4:00 p.m., February 1, 2023
Filing Fee … $45.00 ($20.00 petition fee and $25.00 OEC fee)
Offices…Mayor (Begeny)
…City Attorney (Shook)
…President of Council (Jenkins)
…Council Wards 1, 2, 3 and 4
(1-Strickland, 2-Salvati, 3-Pyakurel, 4-Lawson-Rowe)
Partisan Primary – If the number of candidates from a political party is less than or
equal to the number of positions to be filled in the next General Election, then no primary
election need be held.
City of Reynoldsburg – INDEPENDENTS:
Petition: Form 3-N
Signature Requirement (Mayor, City Attorney, Pres of Council) Min. TBD – Max. TBD *
Signature Requirement… (Council Ward 1) Min. TBD – Max. TBD *
Signature Requirement… (Council Ward 2) Min. TBD – Max. TBD *
Signature Requirement… (Council Ward 3) Min. TBD – Max. TBD *
Signature Requirement… (Council Ward 4) Min. TBD – Max. TBD *
Filing Deadline….4:00 p.m., May 1, 2023
Filing Fee … $45.00 ($20.00 petition fee and $25.00 OEC fee)
* Signatures required for independent candidates in the Hilliard and Reynoldsburg municipal elections are based on
1% of the total votes for governor at the 2022 General Election.

CITY OF WHITEHALL
Handouts: Acknowledgement of Notice of FDS, Acknowledgement of Notice of ORC, Receipt
Petition: “Special – Whitehall”
Signature Requirement… Min. 30 – No Max.c
Filing Deadline…4:00 p.m., February 1, 2023
Filing Fee … $45.00 ($20.00 petition fee and $25.00 OEC fee)
Offices…Mayor (Maggard)
… Treasurer (Alexander)
… City Attorney (Bivens)
… President of Council (Potter)
……. Three Council-at-Large Seats
(Bailey, Conison, Kantor)
Non-Partisan Primary – If the number of persons filing such declaration does not exceed
twice the number of offices available for nomination, then no primary election shall be
held for such office. Nominating Committee not required.

VILLAGE OF BRICE charter
Handouts: Acknowledgement of Notice of ORC, Receipt
Petition: Form Brice Special
Signature Requirement…. Min. 10 – Max. 30c
Filing Deadline…4:00 p.m., February 1, 2023
Filing Fee … $30.00 ($10.00 petition fee and $20.00 OEC fee)
Offices…..Mayor
…..Two Council Seats
Non-Partisan Primary – If the number of persons filing such declaration does not exceed twice the number of offices available for nomination, then no primary election shall be held for such office. Petitions shall contain the names and addresses of five registered electors of the Village of Brice designated in advance by the candidate as a nominating
committee.

BOARD OF EDUCATION – COLUMBUS CSD
Handouts: Acknowledgement of Notice of FDS, Acknowledgement of Notice of ORC, Receipt
Petition: Form 2-V- Board of Education Primary (single candidate)
Petition: Board of Education Special (several candidates)
Signature Requirement…….Min. 300 – Max. 900
Filing Deadline…4:00 p.m., February 1, 2023
Filing Fee …….$30.00 ($10.00 pet. & $20.00 O.E.C. fee)
Member of Board of …….Four Board Seats (Adair, Beckerle, Brown, Pierce)
Non-Partisan Primary Election only if there are more than twice the number of candidates as open seats. Columbus City School District candidates are required to file afinancial disclosure statement

c – indicates this is a charter requirement. 

Source: https://vote.franklincountyohio.gov/BOEL-website/media/Election-Info/2023/(1)%20Primary%20Election%20-%20May%202,%202023/(1)%20Notices%20of%20Election/2023-Primary-Schedule-4.pdf

Franklin County needs energetic people to run for office! Libertarian elected officials get to make policy that reduces the scope of government and increases personal liberty.

We encourage first-timers to run for local offices in odd-numbered years. You must file a declaration of candidacy with the Franklin County Board of Elections, with completed petitions containing the number of signatures required for the office you are seeking.

Local offices include city and village council, township trustees, and school board members. With a term or two of local office, you will have the experience and credibility to run a successful campaign for county, state, or federal office, but if you have the qualifications to run for a different office, we won’t turn you down! Before starting your campaign, take a quick look at our “Candidate Quick Start Guide” video (27 minutes).

Check out Election and Candidate Resources.

We can help you. Please complete this form, and our Political Director will be in contact with you.

Contact Information *
Required
Name: *
Phone:
Email: *
What office do you want to run for? (required) : *
 
 


If We Ride the Cantillon Wave, We Should Remember That We’ll Crash with It Too

My daughter sometimes surfs the bore wave that heralds the incoming tide at Turnagain Arm, Alaska. The wave, or waves, to be exact, can reach a height of ten feet, but are usually smaller. Regardless of the size, the waves draw surfers from all over, each looking for the rush of riding a crest, and hoping not to crash in the foam.

While I have yet to surf those freezing waters, which are bounded by menacing quicksand-like mudflats, I recently rode a wave that lasted almost two years. To tell the truth, I enjoyed the ride. Sure, I knew my wave was the least of the series, with a subsequent one roaring in the distance. And I knew I had no chance of reaching the safety of a sandy shore before I was left crushed, broken, and shirtless by the tidal wave to come.

However, I also recognized that even if I skipped the thrills of the first wave, I would have ended up the same. There was neither a harbor nor breakwater to calm the seas on the ominous horizon. So I enjoyed the ride. What else could I do?

Irish banker Richard Cantillon is known for the observation that the first recipients of new money benefit at the expense of later ones. This is due to the first recipients being able to use the new money to purchase goods, assets, services, etc., while prices remain relatively low—these are the winners. By the time that money circulates into subsequent hands, prices have risen, offsetting any benefit. And, finally, when that money passes into later hands, prices have exceeded the nominal value of inflated wallets—these folks are the losers.

So when inflation—the increase in the money supply—occurs, you want to be riding the crest of the wave, letting others crash as it breaks over them.

Now the covid wave was huge—huge. And it kept on going. In all instances, I was a first recipient, as Uncle Sam stuffed my bank account on a regular basis—thousands and thousands of dollars, all totaled. With that money, I purchased stuff, took trips, etc. I really enjoyed being a first recipient. But then the wave of money stopped. 

That was in December, right around the time alarms were sounding the approaching doom.

I only rode the small wave that was bread and circuses for the masses. It was the payoff—the sleight of hand—which veiled the looming wave that dwarfed the first. The dollars churning in the groundswell and frothing off the white caps of that beckoning breaker, though somewhat delayed, were first received by the friends and family, so to speak, of government. And it’s the money rushing out of the friends and family wave that has me crashing daily at the pump and grocery store.

You can choose to ride a bore tide, risking the murky waters and mudflats. Or you can pick a vista along the road or mountainside to watch others surf the sea. It’s your choice. However, when the wave is an inflationary one, there is no means to opt out of crest and crash. Your only hope is to be connected to influence and power so that the bulk of the money passes through your hands first. Otherwise, the best you can do is enjoy some fun before it all comes crashing down on you.

So, on one hand, you reap at the expense of others, leaving suffering in your wake, while on the other hand, you can, at best, taste a few drops of the Cantillon waters before drowning in its depths. Neither are ways to live a good life. Neither are ways to secure a future.

The Cantillon effect is not just theoretical, it’s real. For almost two years, I rode a small Cantillon wave. And now, a colossal one is crashing all around me. When I was riding the ridge, I knew what was coming. Yet, just like King Canute, I had no power to influence the tide. I could only ride my wave until the tidal wave overtook me. And now I am paying, and paying, for the wave that has eroded the sand under my feet, fortifying the balance sheets of those better connected.
Author:

Jim Fedako, a business analyst and homeschooling father of seven, lives in the wilds of suburban Columbus. 

Reprinted with permission: https://mises.org/wire/if-we-ride-cantillon-wave-we-should-remember-well-crash-it-too

Dominoes

Every now and then I go on social media to remind myself why we deserve extinction. My most recent example is something that’s been going asking if people have noticed that every couple that appears in television commercials is interracial. And the typical response is that it’s the work of woke corporations trying to push diversity on the general public. 

And there’s the outcry every time a black actor is cast in a Star Wars project.

Bob Jones University, a Baptist college, used to have rules against interracial dating until they were dropped following a media outcry after George Bush spoke there during the 2000 Presidential Campaign. They now allow interracial dating, provided both parties bring notes from their parents saying they give permission for their adult children to date someone of another race. Without said note, the university will respect the wishes of the parents (nudge, nudge, wink, wink).

Now what does this have to do with Roe vs Wade? 

When Roe v Wade was struck down on June 24th some people hailed it as a victory; some people decried it as a step backwards for women; others said the issue was merely sent back to the States where it should have been all along. Some states will keep it legal; some states already have trigger laws to criminalize abortion the moment Roe v Wade is overturned.

But does anyone think it will end there. 

Justice Clarence Thomas, in his written opinion, cited several other decisions he would like to see reversed using the same justification used to reverse Roe, these include the the decisions legalizing same-sex marriage, same-sex activity, and contraception. The Texas State Republican Party just condemned all three as part of their State Party Platform. They’re already talking about bringing those issues back before the Supreme Court. 

But there’s a decision Justice Thomas didn’t mention, the decision that legalized interracial marriage. 

And that brings me back to the beginning. 

I’ve seen too many people decrying interracial couples on social media not to think they wouldn’t jump at the chance to have that decision reversed too. I’ve seen too many people jump on the bandwagon of religious extremism to justify their own hates and fears.

We, as a people, need to step up and protect our freedoms from being eaten away by those who always believe they’re doing the right thing. 

Otherwise Roe will be only the first domino to fall.

Ken HolppFCLPO Communications Director 

Regional Development Meeting – Pickaway

Wed, July 27 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm

Learn about ballot access, running for local office, state and local issues, and developing a county party to support local candidates and issues.

Jackie Ray’s Grill 20 Cromley St 
Ashville, OH 43103 United States

Get directions and learn more: https://www.fclpo.org/event/regional-development-meeting-pickaway/

FCLP at the Stonewall Pride March and Festival

Thanks to everyone who volunteered and donated for our successful float and booth at the Stonewall Pride March and Festival!

Kudos to Drake and Cooper Lundstrom for their patience and charm, spell binding the crowd with balloon twisting artistry!

Your support makes events like this possible! Please donate, volunteer or get involved!

Donate today to support Irvine for Ohio and our Libertarian candidates across the state!
Donate today to support Franklin County Libertarian candidates and issues!

FCLP Committee Updates

During the 5/17/2022 business meeting for the Franklin County Libertarian Party of Ohio Central Committee the following actions were taken.

The following individuals were elected to the following roles:

Central Committee

  • Chair – Michael Sweeney
  • Vice-Chair – John Stewart
  • Treasurer – Chris Gill 
  • Secretary – Ken Holpp

Executive Committee

  • Chair – Michael Sweeney
  • Vice-Chair – Drake Lundstrom
  • Treasurer – Pat Hoffman
  • Secretary – Ken Holpp
  • At Large – Jordan Bertke
  • At Large – John Stewart
  • At Large – Chris Gill

After the elections we discussed and voted on the following changes to the FCLPO By-Laws:

Bylaw D – Central Committee, Section 2.

In the event the Secretary of State denies ballot access as a recognized party, Central Committee shall dissolve at the end of their term. After dissolution a new Executive Committee will be chosen by direct election and assume the duties of this committee not already conferred.

FCLP Bylaws. https://www.fclpo.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/05/FranklinCountyBylaws_rev2022.pdf

These changes were adopted by unanimous vote and should be considered applied to the current Central and Executive Committee. 

Thanks to everyone for your patience and generous assistance.

Michael Sweeney

Chair, Franklin County Libertarians